In the US, men have a 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer, and for women the risk is 1 in 3.

Micronutrients can prevent mutation and cancer
                                                                                                    A paper (J Nucleic Acids 2010 Sep 22; pii 725071 and also in the prestigious peer reviewed Pubmed) from the Nutrition and Metabolism Center at the Children´s Hospital, Oakland, California (Ames B N ) has summarised three of their recent research studies and concluded that optimising micronutrient intake will in turn optimise metabolism, decrease DNA damage and result in less cancer as well as other degenerative diseases associated with ageing.   The three studies looked at

  1. The delay of mitochondrial decay through ageing and free-radical damage could be minimised by supplementation with lipoic acid and acetyl carnitine.
  2. How even modest micronutrient deficiencies (common in much of the population) accelerate molecular aging, including DNA damage and mitochondrial decay. This work included an in-depth analysis of vitamin K that suggests the importance of achieving optimal micronutrient intake for longevity.
  3. The finding that a loss of enzyme function can result from protein deformation and loss of function due to an age-related decline in membrane fluidity or mutation. The loss of enzyme function can be compensated by a high dietary intake of any of the B vitamins.

Researchers concluded that ´optimising micronutrient intake could have a major effect on the prevention of cancer and other degenerative diseases of ageing

Micronutrients have a substantial impact on a woman’s health throughout her entire life. Every woman needs a constant, balanced, and adequate supply of all essential nutrients throughout her lifetime

Micronutrients have a substantial impact on a woman’s health throughout her entire life. Every woman needs a constant, balanced, and adequate supply of all essential nutrients throughout her lifetime.

Many women do not get enough of the micronutrients they need, however. Both in the U.S. and worldwide, inadequate intakes are far too common. Deficiencies of the following

nutrients are particularly common:
• Vitamin D • B vitamins • Calcium
• Zinc • Iron

In addition to low dietary intake, other factors can contribute to micronutrient deficiencies,

• genetic factors

• poor absorption

• drug-nutrient interactions

• acute and chronic health conditions

• stress

• normal processes of aging

The fact is that many women cannot get adequate amounts of some nutrients without supplementing their diets.

Research Shows the Importance of Micronutrients to Women’s Health
Breast Health

Breast health issues are one of the most common reasons why women consult their health care practitioners. Research suggests that several micronutrients play key roles in breast health, including iodine, B vitamins, vitamin D, calcium, and vitamin C.2–4 Uterine and Ovarian Health
Micronutrient status plays a major role in the overall health and function of the uterus and ovaries, which can be affected by a variety of health issues. Research suggests that supplementation with B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D may support uterine and ovarian health.

Menstrual Cycle Health
Many women experience physical and emotional challenges relating to their menstrual cycle, and research suggests that several micronutrients support a healthy menstrual cycle—including increased B vitamins, vitamin C, magnesium, and zinc.7–9 Urinary Tract Health Women are at greater risk for urinary tract health issues than men. Statistically at least one-third of American women will develop urinary tract health issues, which also become more frequent with age. Recent research found that adequate vitamin D intake may protect against urinary health issues.

Anxiety and Mental Health

Mental health challenges are much more prevalent in women than men, and research continues to investigate the importance of vitamins and minerals for mental health. Higher intakes of vitamin D and magnesium have been associated with improved mental health and function.11,12

Birth Control / Contraceptives
Oral contraceptives have been shown to lower levels of B vitamins, vitamin C, and zinc in the body, causing researchers to recommend that women taking contraceptives should pay close attention to
their vitamin and mineral intake and consider supplementation.
Conception and Pregnancy Many women know the importance of vitamins and minerals during pregnancy, but recent research also emphasizes the importance of micronutrient status in the time period before conception. Micronutrient deficiencies can also negatively impact fertility. B vitamins, vitamin D, iodine, selenium, antioxidants, iron, and vitamin A have been shown to be key nutrients in fertility and maternal, fetal, and infant health.

Postpartum Mood

Postpartum mood challenges are common—affecting at least 12–16% of mothers. Studies have linked low intakes of micronutrients with increased incidence of mood issues, and have suggested that supplementation can help maintain healthy mood in postpartum women. B vitamins, selenium, vitamin D, and magnesium have been suggested to promote healthy mood. Menopausal and Bone Health
Menopause can affect women’s nutritional needs, and research has shown that B vitamins and vitamin D are particularly important. Minerals are also crucial after menopause, since one of the most significant changes associated with perimenopause and post menopause is a decrease in mineral
levels, which can negatively impact bone health in particular. Magnesium, zinc, and calcium are all important minerals to support postmenopausal bone health.

REFERENCES
1. Seibel M. Fertil Steril 1999;72(4).
2. Ghent W, et al. Can J Surg 1993; 35(5):453–60.
3. Zhang SM. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol 2004;16(1):19–25.
4. Lazzeroni M, et al. Breast 2011;20(Suppl 3):S36–41.
5. Killicdag EB, et al. Hum Reprod 2005;20(6):1521–8.
6. Firouzabadi Rd, et al. Complement Ther Clin Pract 2012;18(2):85–8.
7. P.O. Chocano-Bedoya, et al. Am J Clin Nutr 2011 May;93(5):1080–6.
8. De Souza MC, et al. J Womens Health Gend Based Med
2000;9(2):131–9.
9. Abraham G. J Reprod Med 1983;28:446–64.
10. O Hertting, et al. PLoS One 2010;Dec 14;5(12):e15580.
11. Zender R, et al. Nurs Clin N Am 2009;44(3):355–364.
12. Murphy P, et al. J Midwifery Women’s Health 2008;53:440–446.
13. Veninga KS. J Nurse Midwifery 1984;29(6):386–90.

14. Webb JL. J Reprod Med 1980;25(4):150–6.

15. Allen LH. Am J Clin Nutr 2005;81(5):1206S–1212S.

16. Davison KM, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2012;57(2):85–92.
17. Leung BM, et al. J Am Diet Assoc 2009;109(9):1566–75.
18. Mokhber N, et al. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med
2011;24(1):104–8.
19. Jacka FN, et al. J Affect Disord in press 2012.
20. Seibel MM. Fertil Steril 1999;72(4):579–91.
21. Grochans E, et al. Magnes Res 2011;24(4):209–14.
22. Chapuy M, et al. Br Med J 1994;308:1081–82.
23. Stendig-Lindberg G, et al. Magnes Res 1993;6:155–163.

Use of micronutrients attenuates cannabis and nicotine abuse as evidenced from a reversal design: a case study

Use of micronutrients attenuates cannabis and nicotine abuse as evidenced from a reversal design: a case study

  • Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Abstract

Prior research shows that micronutrients, particularly amino acids, can assist individuals with substance dependence to quit various drugs of abuse, including cannabis, alcohol, and cocaine. As part of a wider investigation of the impact of micronutrients (mostly vitamins and minerals) on psychiatric symptoms, such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), depression, and anxiety, we observed that many participants reduced or eliminated use of alcohol, cigarettes, and cannabis. One case using a single-case reversal (off-on-off-on-off) design is presented and shows not only on-off control of psychiatric symptoms as micronutrients are consumed or withdrawn, but also simultaneous on-off use of cannabis and cigarettes, despite not directly targeting this substance use as part of the treatment protocol. This case adds to a growing body of research supporting the use of micronutrients in the treatment of psychiatric symptoms and suggests it may extend to substance dependence. Micronutrients, by assisting with mood regulation and reductions in anxiety, may assist with successful cessation of drug use. Alternatively, they may directly impact on the brain reward circuitry believed to be involved in the expression of addictions, thereby providing the appropriate precursors and cofactors necessary for adequate neurotransmitter synthesis. This case should continue to stimulate researchers to consider the role of nutrients, in particular vitamins and minerals, in drug treatment programs and encourage more rigorous trials.